Last edited by Kazibei
Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of 1858 Oberlin-Wellington rescue found in the catalog.

1858 Oberlin-Wellington rescue

Roland M Baumann

1858 Oberlin-Wellington rescue

a reappraisal

by Roland M Baumann

  • 84 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States. -- Fugitive slave law (1850),
  • Oberlin-Wellington Rescue, 1858,
  • Fugitive slaves -- United States,
  • Slavery -- United States,
  • Abolitionists -- Ohio -- Oberlin -- History -- 19th century

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 39-44) and index

    Statementby Roland M. Baumann ; foreword by Frederick J. Blue
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 52 p. :
    Number of Pages52
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18139134M

    Not on My Watch: The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue of Watch history unfold right before your eyes in a compelling performance of “Not on My Watch: The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue of ” presented Sunday, October 16 at 3 p.m. at the House of Zion Fellowship Hall . Gordon S. Barker Source: Civil War Book Review 'The 'Colored Hero' of Harper’s Ferry is a welcome addition to an extensive literature on Brown and the Harpers Ferry raid this impressively researched book is a must-read for students of abolitionism.' The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue: A Reappraisal. Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College, Author: Steven Lubet.

    Get this from a library! History of the Oberlin-Wellington rescue. [Jacob R Shipherd; Simeon Bushnell; C H Langston; Ralph Plumb; Henry E Peck] -- The arrest of John, a fugitive slave of John G. Bacon of Kentucky, residing in Oberlin, Ohio, and his release from the . The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue of On Septem , a runaway slave named John Price, from Maysville, Kentucky, was arrested by a United States marshal in Oberlin, Ohio. Under the Fugitive Slave Law of , the federal government assisted slaveholders in reclaiming their runaway slaves.

      Septem , marked the start of a drama that played out in and around the northern Ohio town of Oberlin, in what is known today as the Oberlin-Wellington Rescue. On this date, John Price, a 17 year old fugitive slave from Kentucky who was living in the town, was captured by slave catchers and federal marshals under the authority of the Fugitive Slave Law of This situation came to a head with the Oberlin-Wellington Rescue, a pivotal event described in Nat Brandt's book The Town That Started the Civil War. On Septem , a fugitive named John Price was captured by federal officials and held in neighboring Wellington, : Lorain.


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1858 Oberlin-Wellington rescue by Roland M Baumann Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue: A Reappraisal written by Roland M. Baumann, Archivist and Adjunct Professor of History at Oberlin College, provides a basic narrative of the events ofwhile focusing on the underlying theme he sees as essential to the incident and the town’s reaction.

In addition, Baumann addresses the motivations of the participants, the degree of organization that existed among the rescuers. The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue These were twenty of 1858 Oberlin-Wellington rescue book thirty-seven citizens from Oberlin and Wellington who were charged with breaking the law by helping File Size: KB.

Beyond the River: The Untold Story of the Heroes of the Underground Railroad and The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue: A Reappraisal Houses of God: Region, Religion and Architecture in. Roland Baumann is an archivist and a history professor, bringing strong control over the source material and analytical rigor to his booklet, The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue: A Reappraisal.

Reading Baumann's crisp, declarative style and precise endnotes was refreshing. Sept. 13, Oberlin Wellington Rescue Eighteen-year-old John Price was arrested by a federal marshal in Oberlin, Ohio under the Fugitive Slave Act of This Day in History.

Reframing Resistance: John Price, Sylvanus Demarest and the Antislavery Culture of the Great Lakes. Overview: This collaborative research project examines the history of black abolitionist resistance on the eve of the American Civil War, through the lens of two related events in the tumultuous year of —the Oberlin-Wellington rescue of John Price, and the rescue of Sylvanus Demarest in.

The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue th Anniversary, A Brief History The photographs and drawings provided by the Oberlin College Archives for the EOG website may be downloaded for educational use in the Oberlin School District classrooms. For other use of Archives photographs scholarly article or book.

On 13 September,citizens and students of Oberlin and citizens of Wellington successfully rescued John Price, a runaway slave living in Oberlin, from slave catchers. As the story is told, Price had been forcefully removed from the outskirts of Oberlin to the Wadsworth House in Wellington, and faced a return to slavery in Kentucky.

The arrest of John, a fugitive slave of John G. Bacon of Kentucky, residing in Oberlin, Ohio, and his release from the hands of the officers by a number of citizens. A digital reproduction made from a copy held by the University of Michigan is available from the University of Michigan's Making of America Web site.

Also available in digital form on the Library of Congress Web site. Get this from a library. The Oberlin-Wellington rescue: a reappraisal. [Roland M Baumann; Oberlin College.]. Today is the th Anniversary of the Oberlin-Wellington Rescue On SeptemJohn Price, a farm laborer in his mids, was kidnapped on a country road in northern Ohio.

A posse of slave hunters organized by a Kentuckian named Anderson Jennings hustled him into a buggy and headed for nearby Wellington, where they planned to take the.

The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue Case of showed how divided Ohio had become over the issue of slavery. On Septema federal marshal in Oberlin, Ohio arrested a fugitive slave named John Price. Under the Fugitive Slave Law ofthe federal government was required to assist slaveholders in reclaiming fugitive slaves.

Oberlin in was considered one of the most racially integrated cities in America and was a hotbed of abolitionism. When the slave  catchers nabbed John Price, a large group of residents from Oberlin and Wellington rose up to rescue him. The rescuers stormed the hotel where the slave catchers were holding : Southeast Messenger.

I was not previously aware of the episode recounted here, the Oberlin-Wellington [Ohio] Rescue of John Price, an escaped slave living in Oberlin who was kidnapped to be returned to slavery under the authority of the Fugitive Slave Act of /5(11).

The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue was one such instance of this. It was a struggle between supporters of slavery and supporters of freedom, the outcome of which would decide the fate of a young African American man named John Price. I found the material on the friendship between Jefferson Davis and William Henry Seward quite interesting, and Chadwick's telling of the Oberlin-Wellington Rescue had me on the edge of my seat.

His account of the Lincoln-Douglas debates goes a long way toward showing why Lincoln was able to win the presidency two years later/5(50). Trailer for an original video production about John Price, a runaway slave, captured and jailed by bounty hunters, who was freed by the anti-slavery citizens of Oberlin and Wellington, Ohio, and.

Oberlin-Wellington Rescue Case of 1 Posted by Jae Jones - J - LATEST POSTS On Septema federal marshal in Oberlin, Ohio arrested a. Presented by The Groveport Heritage and Preservation Society & Kelton House Players. A historical reenactment based on the Nat Brandt book The Town that Started the Civil War.

On the eve of the Civil War, 37 ordinary citizens, both black and white, from the towns of Oberlin and Wellington were arrested for violating the Fugitive Slave Law.

On Septemcitizens and students of Oberlin and citizens of Wellington successfully rescued Price in Wellington, Ohio. The trial of the Oberlin Rescuers and their release from the Cuyahoga County Jail represented one of Oberlin's most remarkable achievements in the battle against the institution of slavery.

Anyone who has attended Oberlin College in Ohio in the last years or so knows of the Oberlin-Wellington Rescue. It dominates the lore of that yeasty place.The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue: A Reappraisal written by Roland M.

Baumann, Archivist and Adjunct Professor of History at Oberlin College, provides a basic narrative of the events ofwhile focusing on the underlying theme he sees as essential to the incident and the town’s reaction. In addition, Baumann addresses the motivations of the participants, the degree of organization that .texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Full text of "Quinquennial catalogue of officers and graduates".